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6 ways to help a loved one with dementia feel better

6 ways to help a loved one with dementia feel better

Caring for a person with dementia is not easy for the patient himself and for family members. Moreover, the advanced stages of dementia can be frightening. Therefore, we need to help our loved one with dementia make the most of the days and enjoy time with family and friends when they are still able to do it. Every remaining day should be a good day. We give you six ways you can help your loved one with dementia find joy in their remaining days.

Look forward, not back.

Many people caring for a loved one with dementia are grieving the loss of the person their loved one used to be. By focusing on who your loved one used to be before being detected with dementia, your loved one could feel it and it can end up embarrassing him/her. You need to focus on your loved one’s well being and happiness by accepting that your loved one isn’t the same person they once were and move on.

Think Beyond Safety

Even if you think that your loved one is able to stay alone at home (especially at the earlier stages of dementia), you should also think beyond safety. What is your loved one going to do? Your loved one might be spending hours staring out the window or watching TV. This why it is really important to plan activities that your loved one could do a couple of times a week with other people so you can enjoy also your free time.

Medical conditions controlled

To help people with dementia get the most out of every day, a support is needed when it comes to control medical conditions. You should for example accompany your loved one to medical appointments as people with dementia may forget to tell important things, or forget what the doctors has said. They need someone to be external memory for them.

Enjoy a good meal together

People with dementia generally don’t care about their diet or cholesterol levels. This is why food is often one of the last remaining pleasures. You could organize a big dinner with family once a week with the food your loved one appreciates the most.

Help them stay active

If there is one fact we can't deny, is that physical activity is good for health, helps prevent speeding of cognitive delays and gives us a happy feeling. It could be any activity that makes your loved one move: yoga, dancing, walking, etc.

Art is joy

Numerous studies have shown that art activities provide many benefits for people with dementia such as: improved alertness, happiness, positive emotional state and independence, improved quality of life and social interaction, long-term memory, increased physical movement or increased participation. Music, for example, can help you remember things and theater activities can increase participation.