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Being sexually active could slow Parkinson’s disease

Being sexually active could slow Parkinson’s disease

There's currently no cure for Parkinson's disease, but a recent study gives some hope that the disease can be at least slowed down.

The treatment? Sexual activity.

A 24 month study, published by the European Journal of Neurology, analyzed the relationship between an active sexual life and the progression of Parkinson’s disease in early-stage.

Parkinson’s disease is a type of long term, progressive, degenerative illness that affects the central nervous system, causing debilitating physical symptoms over time including tremors, loss of balance and motor skills, and rigidity.

Patients of the study were aged of 57 on average with early Parkinson’s disease. They were tested for motor disability, cognitive abilities, and quality of life. Moreover, individuals were asked whether they had been sexually active in the past 12 months.

The study shows that sexually active men tended to have a better quality of life, to have a slower disease progression and to have had an earlier onset of symptoms (less severe motor disability and less memory problems) compared to non-active male patients.

Regarding the small group of women from the study, no association between sexual activity and disease symptoms were shown but it can be explained by the fact that they were less open to discuss their sexual life with researchers.

Anyway, these findings are quite good news for doctors and patients, knowing that Parkinson's disease affects millions of people.